Guerrilla Billionaire

How To Become a Billionaire

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Billionaire dude Mark Cuban shares some advice.

“It’s not in the dreaming, it’s in the doing.”

“I love to challenge conventional wisdom. I’m a big believer that in business and in politics, when everyone is doing the same thing, none are probably as effective or successful as they could be. Typically it’s not prudent for people within those industries, parties, or organizations to stand up and challenge the incumbents. It is usually a formula for losing a job, customer, or endorsement. My businesses are usually built around challenging conventional wisdom, so I tend to gain by taking the other side. It’s been very profitable and entertaining for me.”

“If you have managers reporting to managers in a startup, you will fail. Once you get beyond startup, if you have managers reporting to managers, you will create politics.”

“Open offices keep everyone in tune with what is going on and keep the energy up. If an employee is about privacy, show him or her how to use the lock on the bathroom.”

“Don’t start a company unless it’s an obsession and something you love. If you have an exit strategy, it’s not an obsession.”

“A sure sign of failure for a startup is when someone sends me logo-embroidered polo shirts. If your people are at shows and in public, it’s okay to buy for your own employees, but if you really think people are going to wear your branded polo when they’re out and about, you are mistaken and have no idea how to spend your money.”

On the biggest lie CEOs always tell

On the biggest lie CEOs always tell

“We are acting in the best interests of shareholders.”

“It doesn’t matter how many times you fail. You only have to be right once and then everyone can tell you that you are an overnight success.”

On why “follow your passion” is the worst advice you could ever get

On why "follow your passion" is the worst advice you could ever get

Because everyone is passionate about something. Usually more than one thing. We are born with it. There are always going to be things we love to do. That we dream about doing. That we really, really want to do with our lives. Those passions aren’t worth a nickel.

Think about all the things you have been passionate about in your life. Think about all those passions that you considered making a career out of or building a company around. How many were or are there? Why did you bounce from one to another? Why were you not able to make a career or business out of any of those passions? Or if you have been able to have some success, what was the key to the success?

Today’s twenty-somethings were raised to find our dreams and follow them. But it’s a different world. And as the jobless generation grows up, we realize the grand betrayal of the false idols of passion. This philosophy no longer works for us, or at most, feels incomplete. So what do we do? I propose a different frame of reference: Forget about finding your passion. Instead, focus on finding big problems.

“Treat your customers like they own you. Because they do.”

 

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